Instructor Bios

All our instructors have received their belts directly from Master Charles Gracie.

For the safety of our students and the integrity of the art, an annual background check is performed on each instructor.

EMILY BATTAGLIA: (Purple Belt, Kids Instructor)

When did you start bjj and why?  I started BJJ after watching my two kids do it for a year. I was interested but very nervous. I didn’t think I was strong enough physically. One day one of the upper belts invited me to try it out and I did. I was immediately hooked. I started, and stuck with it, because I wanted to get stronger and build my self-confidence. Also, it’s really fun.

What about coaching do you like or why do you coach?  I like seeing the kids grow and build their strength and confidence. And I love watching them have fun with the sport and with each other. Also teaching helps me learn, because putting something into words makes you think about it in new ways.

What is your favorite position to teach?  I like teaching takedowns because the kids really enjoy them. I like coaching them during practice matches, encouraging them to try things.

What three bjj habits do you consider essential?

    •  1. show up regularly even when you don’t feel like it — you will always be glad you went and your training partners depend on you.
    • 2. stay present when you are training, don’t get discouraged by placing expectations on yourself or by judging your own progress.
    • 3. take care of injuries properly; sometimes being strong means saying I can’t train today with this injury even though I want to.

What has bjj taught you?  Training BJJ has taught me to tolerate pain and discomfort and work through them without panicking. This has given me trust and confidence in myself. It has also helped me to build bonds of trust with my teammates and coaches.

Coaching kids has taught me how to better relate to kids, even my own kids. Learning to better relate to kids was an area where I wanted to grow personally. Shadowing Coach Kelly has taught me a lot about how to connect with kids and help them grow.

When you are not on the mats how do you like to spend your time?  When I am not on the mat I love to be outside, walking, hiking or swimming. When work allows, I enjoy doing Crossfit. I love to cook, watch sci-fi, read, spend time with friends, and go on road trip adventures with my kids.

ANDREW GREGORY: (Purple Belt, Kids Instructor)

When did you start BJJ?  I started training in BJJ in 2008 and I started coaching in 2017.

What about coaching do you like, or why do you coach?  Coaching, for me, has 2 parts; passing along the skills and discipline of BJJ to our children is very rewarding. It also provides me a different view of the sport which allows me to better develop my own skills.

What is your favorite position to teach?  I like to teach back and side-control.

What three bjj habits do you consider essential?

    • Take care of your body – you are an athlete
    • Take care of your mind – you are worth it
    • Protect your neck – getting choked sucks!

What has training bjj taught you?  BJJ has taught me to slow down and breath.

When you are not on the mat, how else do you like to spend your time?  I spend my free time with my family working on our farm, growing, raising and playing with our food!

JACK EGAN: (Purple Belt, Kids & Adult Instructor)

When did you start bjj and why?  I started BJJ in 2013 because if I was going to be a skinny white kid, I wanted to be a skinny white kid that could fight.

What about coaching do you like or why do you coach?  Coaching others adds a new layer of development to my Jiu-Jitsu as teaching a technique to others is the best way to demonstrate proficiency in it.   It’s also rewarding to empower others the way my coaches did for me.

What is your favorite position to teach?  My favorite position is attacks from the back.

What three bjj habits do you consider essential?   The mind to muscle connection, self defense and confidence

What has bjj taught you?  Training BJJ has built my confidence, mental toughness, and taught me how to remain calm in high stress situations.

When you are not on the mats how do you like to spend your time?  Playing La Crosse, working out and hanging with friends.

ADAM GOTTLIEB: (Brown Belt, BJJ & MMA Instructor)

When did you start bjj and why?

What about coaching do you like or why do you coach?

What is your favorite position to teach?

What three bjj habits do you consider essential? 

What has bjj taught you?

When you are not on the mats how do you like to spend your time?

JASON LUCHS: (Black Belt Professor, BJJ & MMA Instructor)

When did you start bjj and why?

What about coaching do you like or why do you coach?

What is your favorite position to teach?

What three bjj habits do you consider essential? 

What has bjj taught you?

When you are not on the mats how do you like to spend your time?

JOE STOKES: (Black Belt Professor, Adult Instructor)

When did you start bjj and why? – I started bjj at 37 years old.  That puts me on the mats for 11 year.  I didn’t wrestle or anything as a kid, but always loved a good altercation.  After a couple years and a bunch of tournaments later, I set a goal for achieving my black belt.

What about coaching do you like or why do you coach?  In the beginning coaching was a selfish motivation for me.  Looking for as much mat time as possible, I soon learned that I enjoyed the excitement through the eyes of kids and eventually adults.  This held me accountable to provide proper instruction and work on my own Jiu-Jitsu.

What is your favorite position to teach?  Everything I have I have earned with my own two hands.  That being said, I enjoy teaching techniques from the bottom – Guard, 1/2 guard, mounted etc.  These positions require detail, toughness and maximum reward or failure.

What three bjj habits do you consider essential?  Through my years of training I’ve found work ethic, patience, and self control have been essential habit for Jiu-Jitsu longevity.

What has bjj taught you?  You have to find comfort in uncomfortable situations. – Rickson Gracie  This goes for life’s experiences as well!

When you are not on the mats how do you like to spend your time?  I have a hard time not thinking about Jiu-Jitsu – LOL , but when I’m not on the mats I enjoy friends, family, working out, being outside and moving forward in life in a positive manner.

REMY PERMINAS: (Black Belt Professor, 1st Degree , Adult Instructor)

When did you start bjj and why? 10 years ago.

What about coaching do you like or why do you coach? I simply love seeing kids/adults confidence grow and sharing this feel right to me.

What is your favorite position to teach? I like to teach stand up and closed guard.

What three bjj habits do you consider essential?  I consider discipline, being active and learning how to relax to be essential to this sport.

What has bjj taught you? How to be invincible in every way.

When you are not on the mats how do you like to spend your time? Snowmobiling, Mountain Biking and Motorcycle Riding.

Kelly Hassell Cramer: (Black Belt Professor, 2nd Degree, Adult, Kids & Women Instructor)

When did you start bjj and why? I believe it was 2005.   I started BJJ because I was fascinated by the ability to subdue someone of greater size and strength, with leverage and technique.  Unlike wrestling, I only needed to move myself to establish positional control.

What about coaching do you like or why do you coach? I really enjoy watching people improve their physical skill set, and expand their mental capacity in any given moment.  It is my privilege to be a small part of that development.

What is your favorite position to teach?  Halfguard is probably my favorite position.  I believe that transitions is what makes your BJJ strong, and halfguard is half way to everywhere.

What three bjj habits do you consider essential? 

1. Drill!  Drill with all shapes all sizes, drill with your eyes closed……build that muscle memory.

2. Drill in and out of the position or submission.  Another words, work on the transitions.

3. Be preventative with your BJJ.  If you keep getting caught somewhere, figure out at what point you can stop it before you are caught.  The same for offense, if you keep missing something, try to notice when the move failed so you can be anticipatory next time.

What has bjj taught you?  I consider BJJ a huge metaphor for life.  Your Jiu-Jitsu is constantly evolving, it is your creation and it is an immense possibility.

When you are not on the mats how do you like to spend your time?  I love being outdoors, spending time with my family/friends, and I love to travel.   I am strongly connected to nature and enjoy running and hiking the mountains, paddling the lakes, gardening and taking care of my animals.

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